Tuesday, May 30, 2017

This Summer: Meet Alumni and Faculty Around The World

This summer, prospective students are invited to attend one of the following events around the world, to engage with alumni and faculty. Take this opportunity to do further research on Johns Hopkins SAIS and learn why our alumni chose to study economics, politics, security, and diplomacy at one of the most prestigious graduate schools of international affairs. Visit our Around the World web page for more details and to register for an event near you.

Francis J. Gavin is the Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor and the inaugural director of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS.




















Beijing: June 1 

Join Johns Hopkins SAIS alumni and Roger Leeds, Director of the Center for International Business and Public Policy, who will lead a discussion on China-specific topics covered in his recently published book, “Private Equity Investing in Emerging Markets.” 

Singapore: June 7 

Join Johns Hopkins SAIS alumni and Roger Leeds, Director of the Center for International Business and Public Policy, who will lead a discussion on “Private Equity Investing: Risks & Opportunities in Emerging Markets Compared to Western Countries."

Cape Town: June 22 

Join Johns Hopkins SAIS alumni and Francis J. Gavin, Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor and the inaugural director of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs, who will lead an informal discussion on “The United States, Peace, and World Order” over dinner. 

Tokyo: August 5

Join Johns Hopkins alumni and Francis J. Gavin, Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor and the inaugural director of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs, who will lead a discussion on “The United States, Peace, and World Order” over dinner and drinks."

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Office Closure Alert: May 26-May 29

In observance of Commencement and Memorial Day, the Office of Admissions will be closed Friday, May 26 through Monday, May 29. Normal operations will resume Tuesday, May 30.

Friday, May 19, 2017

2016-2017 International Human Rights Clinic Students Present Findings on Peru, Kenya, and Sri Lanka Forest Defenders



On May 16, International Human Rights Clinic students hosted a roundtable discussion on their forthcoming report, "They Protect the Forests. Who Protects Them? The Intersection of Conservation, Development, and Human Rights of Forest Defenders." The team discussed lessons from Kenya, Peru, and Sri Lanka.

The International Human Rights Clinic is a course offered by the International Law and Organizations program designed to teach students skills for careers in international human rights advocacy and protection. These skills will be taught through the use of simulations, discussions, case studies and clinical work. Each student taking the course has the opportunity to gain practical experience in international human rights through clinical work with The Protection Project. Such work may include, writing a human rights report, drafting a model law or fact-finding mission, developing human rights education materials and programming, conducting research, etc. While engaged in clinical work, students in the course will have an opportunity to collaborate with other students in clinics at universities both domestic and abroad. Moreover, students in the course may have the opportunity to participate in conferences and panels on international human rights issues.

Monday, May 15, 2017

Doing All the To-Do’s

Fall classes will begin before you know it. So you're prepared, student blogger Daphne P. shares her method for managing time during the semester.

I am the Queen of To-Do Lists! Every week, I type up a long list of the assignments I have to get through for all of my classes. Then, I break that list down into daily lists that populate a monthly calendar. This allows me to look ahead at what’s coming (am I going away for a weekend? Do I have a special event one night?) and smartly pace myself that week. At the same time, I keep a slip of paper posted on the wall above my desk where I jot down tasks unrelated to school: doctor’s appointments, special errands, applications, volunteer meetings, etc. These are things that don’t need to be done immediately, but at some point in the mid- to long-term. I usually have a general timeline in mind but just tackle them as I can, trying to cross a couple off each week. Finally, on especially busy days, when I have more than the usual errand, in addition to my assignments, I sometimes create yet another list for that day. I combine all the things I have to do loosely in the order I expect to do them, making it easy to track my progress throughout the day.

In several ways, the simple act of writing things down provides a huge stress relief for me. Sure, putting something onto a list doesn’t mean that I’ve actually finished the reading or run the errand! However, it does ensure that I won’t forget to do it, and thereby allows me to expend my energy on whatever task I’m currently working on, rather than on trying to remember everything I have to do! Second, separating my school- and non-school-related responsibilities helps me to prioritize and balance; I can see that I should put off a trip to the dry cleaner to finish the problem set due the next day, or plan to pay some bills between readings to give my brain a break. Finally, writing everything down somehow makes it all seem less overwhelming. By first laying out the “big picture” and then breaking it up into daily goals, it makes the amount of work seem, actually, manageable! Indeed, I credit this approach to staying organized with my ability to manage grad school without neglecting the other important things in my life.

I’m sure you’ve all mastered your own time-management strategies by now! For anyone considering adopting mine, I have two final thoughts: first, keep the calendar view of your assignments on your computer (for easy editing!) and allow yourself the flexibility to rearrange things throughout the week. Your statistics problem set might end up taking twice as long as you thought it would or you might find out about an amazing speaker coming to campus; if some of Tuesday’s tasks have to be shifted to Wednesday, so be it. Consider these lists to be (ambitious?) statements of your intentions, not rigid rules. Second, get yourself a good, bright highlighter. Crossing things off those to-do lists is the best, most satisfying part!

-Daphne 

Monday, May 8, 2017

5 Tips For New Students, From Current SAISers And Alumni

It's been one week since the reply deadline, and the admissions team is still giddy about seeing the offer acceptance letters pour in. We're honored to be able to welcome such a intellectually talented and driven group to the Johns Hopkins family. Since you're officially soon-to-SAISers, we thought you might be interested in reading a few tips from the people who were once in your shoes.



1. Take Advantage of Social Activities


Denise (MA'18) says: "Although it is undeniable that academics are important, it is also important to note that networking and making connections is very valuable to your graduate school experience. Take advantage of of the social activities (networking sessions and happy hours for example) that Johns Hopkins SAIShad to offer."

2. Come With An Open Mind


Daphne (MA'18) says: "Come to Johns Hopkins SAIS with confidence and an open mind. Remember that you were admitted not just because the selection committee thought you could get something out of this program, but because they believed you could contribute something meaningful to it. So think about what it is that you can bring to SAIS, as well as what you want to learn from your peers and professors, and come ready to shape your education." 

3. Don't Be Afraid Of Faculty


Zach (MA'17) says: "Every professor has been very willing to meet with me to discuss topics related and unrelated to their area of expertise. I have even found professors whom I am not taking classes with receptive to meeting."

4. Share Your Diverse Perspective


Taina (GPP'16) says: "One of the most rewarding aspects about SAIS is the opportunity to study in a diverse environment. So international students should know that their participation is one of the things that makes SAIS great."

5. Use The Classroom As A Platform For Discussion


Julian (MA'14) says: "You will benefit so much if you are open to new ideas, conversations and friendships. Johns Hopkins SAIS is hard work but set aside time to form your personal and professional connections from the start. One thing I learned—the hard way—is that being direct about your career and professional goals will get you a long way. Finally, don’t believe everything you read and use the classroom as a platform to engage in meaningful debates and express your personal opinion. You will be discussing them with the brightest young minds in international affairs."

Friday, May 5, 2017

You're Invited: Open Events at Johns Hopkins SAIS May 8-May 12

Johns Hopkins SAIS hosts hundreds of events each year, many of which are free and open to the public. Offering a wide spectrum of viewpoints on current global issues, these events give students the opportunity to interact with thought leaders in various industries. While many of these events are exclusive to Johns Hopkins SAIS students and alumni, a number are free and open to the public. We invite you to join us for some of the events below.

Monday, May 8


Cultural Diplomacy to Tackle Today's Global Challenges with Midori
Vali Nasr, Dean of the School of Advanced International Studies, and Fred Bronstein, Dean of the Peabody Institute, invite you to join world class violinist and UN Messenger of Peace Midori, and a distinguished panel, for a 360 degree reflection on how cultural diplomacy can help better address today’s most pressing global challenges.

Thursday, May 11


Unmasked: Corruption in the West Book Release with Laurence Cockcroft
'Unmasked: Corruption in the West' examines corruption in political finance, lobbying, multinational companies, the judiciary and the police, environmental regulation, and sport. This a unique analysis of corruption in Europe and America showing how far the west has to go to clean its own house – while the world is watching. 
Dean Nasr and the Johns Hopkins SAIS Distinguished Scholar Antony Blinken will moderate the discussion.


Thursday, May 4, 2017

Headaches and Housing

Hi Everyone! Today I’ll be talking about my experience finding housing for my studies at Johns Hopkins SAIS. When it time came to consider housing options, I was fortunate due to the fact that my family lives relatively close to area. Prior to moving to Williamsburg for my undergraduate studies, I resided in the Northern Virginia area which (depending on where you live) is around 30 minutes to an hour away from campus via metro.

I decided to make life easier (and cheaper) for myself by just moving back in with my family for an additional two years. My advice to anyone who has family nearby is to consider the possibility of moving back home for however long your time at Johns Hopkins SAIS will be. Although, the transition from living on my own to being back with my parents was challenging at the beginning, I do not regret my decision because it has saved me a lot of money and has given me a close support system through my family.

Thanks for Reading!
Denise

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Then & Now: A Check In With Julian Palma (MA'14)

We first interviewed Julian Palma in 2013, during his first year of study as a Master of Arts candidate. In our previous Q&A,  Julian discussed his motivation for working in international relations and his post- Johns Hopkins SAIS career goals. This week, almost four years later, we caught up with Julian to see how his career goals have come to life, and how his education at Johns Hopkins SAIS impacts the work he does today.


Julian, what did you study as a Johns Hopkins SAIS student?


I earned a Master of Arts from Johns Hopkins SAIS in 2014. I concentrated my studies in conflict management. Prior to earning the MA, I earned a BS in Business Management from Lynn University (2007) with a semester abroad at John Cabot University in Rome (2005).

Tell us about your current role. 


As an urban development and disaster risk management specialist, I have been involved in the design and implementation of lending investments financed by the World Bank in key urban sectors such as urban transport, solid waste management, slum upgrading and municipal finance. I have also provided specific advisory services to national and local governments with respect to housing affordability and resilience, public-private partnerships and the modernization of hydro-meteorological systems. My international development portfolio is mainly focused in the Latin America Region (Bolivia, Colombia, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru and Uruguay) but I have provided cross-support to projects in other regions including India, Indonesia, South Africa and fragile states like Afghanistan.

How do you think your education experience prepared you for this work?


My experience at SAIS had a positive impact in the work I do today and has prepared me in several fronts. First, it has provided me with an increased understanding of economic development through rigorous coursework including corporate finance, statistics, quantitative global economics and international trade theory. Second, it provided me with the right mix of research, analytical and policy skills needed for sectorial work. In particular, a lot of my electives were from the Energy and Environment Program and that’s where my passion for urban development began. Finally, SAIS gave me global knowledge and exposure, not only through my coursework but also through my friends and colleagues, and that helped refined the soft diplomacy skills needed to work as an international public servant.

Did you leverage the school’s network? 


Prior to attending Johns Hopkins SAIS, I had served as a Foreign Service Officer for Colombia (my home country) and the plan was to return to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. However, I still took advantage of Career Services activities, and I’m grateful I did. The concept of “networking”—particularly sending out cold emails—is practically unheard of in Colombia and that was an additional skill I had to develop. It was awkward at the beginning but I learned why it was so important. It provides first-hand information on the job-market and allows for sincere conversations, particularly when you talk to other SAIS alumni, who have been there, just like you, on the search. By the end of my second year, one of my classmates was the one who referred me to my actual job.

What advice would you give someone contemplating attending?


You will benefit so much if you are open to new ideas, conversations and friendships. Johns Hopkins SAIS is hard work but set aside time to form your personal and professional connections from the start. One thing I learned—the hard way—is that being direct about your career and professional goals will get you a long way. Finally, don’t believe everything you read and use the classroom as a platform to engage in meaningful debates and express your personal opinion. You will be discussing them with the brightest young minds in international affairs.

Monday, May 1, 2017

You're Invited: Open Events at Johns Hopkins SAIS May 1-May 7

Johns Hopkins SAIS hosts hundreds of events each year, many of which are free and open to the public. Offering a wide spectrum of viewpoints on current global issues, these events give students the opportunity to interact with thought leaders in various industries. While many of these events are exclusive to Johns Hopkins SAIS students and alumni, a number are free and open to the public. We invite you to join us for some of the events below.

On May 3, conflict and governance expert Jon Temin will join us for a panel discussion on South Sudan

Monday, May 1


Conversation on 'Big Data Insights on the US Economy
Moderated by Diana Farrell. Farell is the founding President and Chief Executive Officer of the JPMorgan Chase Institute. The Institute aims to help decision makers – policymakers, businesses, and nonprofit leaders – appreciate the scale, granularity, diversity, and interconnectedness of the global economic system and use better facts, timely data and thoughtful analysis to make smarter decisions to advance global prosperity.

Tuesday, May 2


Advancing Canada's Interests and Defending Canadian Values in the United States
The Honourable Andrew Leslie, Member of Palrliament (Orelans) and Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs for Canada - United States Relations will give the 2016-2017 Thomas O. Enders Memorial Lecture at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). Lieutennant General Leslie is a decorated veteran of the Canadian Armed Forces and former Chief of the Defence Staff.

A Conversation on 'A Valueless Foreign Policy: Can it be American?
Moderated by Roger Cohen. Cohen joined The New York Times in 1990. He was a foreign correspondent for more than a decade before becoming acting foreign editor on Sept. 11, 2001, and foreign editor six months later. Since 2004, he has written a column for The International New York Times, formerly known as The International Herald Tribune.

Wednesday, May 3


Reflections on South Sudan: Origins of the Crisis, Critiques of International Engagement, and What Can Be Done Now
Jon Temin is an expert on conflict and governance issues in the South Sudan and a distinguished SAIS alum. From 2014 to 2017 he served as a member of the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff, providing strategic guidance and long-term planning to the Secretary on Africa issues. Before Policy Planning, he directed the United States Institute of Peace’s Africa program, testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and conducted extensive research in Africa as a Fulbright Fellow.

Thursday, May 4

Addressing Lebanon's Refugee Crisis and Development Challenges
Lebanon is facing overwhelming socioeconomic, security, and demographic challenges as the civil war in neighboring Syria enters its seventh year. Since the start of the crisis, Lebanon has received $4.9 billion in assistance, but demands on the country's resources, services, and civil order remain heavy. Without a political solution to the Syrian conflict, humanitarian and development aid cannot deliver and sustain sufficient results for the refugees or for the Lebanese people. How will Lebanon continue to deal with these conditions?