Friday, October 20, 2017

2018 Admissions Guideline: The myth behind economics courses

When prospective students first hear about the International Economics course requirements at Johns Hopkins SAIS, I often see a look of worry from applicants.  Because we are a school of international studies, we want to make sure that our students are well equipped with the knowledge they need to excel for wherever they go to work internationally or domestically. Yet, I want to reassure you that the economics requirement is not as daunting as it sounds.


In case you didn't know...

Every Master of Arts (MA) student is required to take a minimum of 4 economics courses: intermediate microeconomics, intermediate macroeconomics, international monetary theory, and international trade theory.

But I already know this stuff...

If you feel that you already have a strong economics background or you've taken these courses in the past, you can apply to take a waiver exam online. To find out more about the waiver exam, click here

What if I need help?

Economics is not an easy subject for everyone. We understand that and we want to make sure that all of our students thrive and excel in this area, so there are a lot of helpful resources available on our campus.

1. PEERS IN THE CLASS: Working with your peers in study groups and group projects will not only help you to find a community of students to grow with, but you will also get a better understanding of the topic, course, and assignments. 

2. STUDENT TA'S: Student TA's are a great resource available for students. If you have a question about an assignment or a lecture, you can stop by the office and personally ask one of our wonderful TA's. If you feel that you have a strong grasp, you can apply to be a TA yourself. 

3. WEEKLY FACULTY MEETINGS: The International Economics Program invites professors every Thursday afternoon to present and receive feedback on research papers. 

4. BROWN BAG EVENTS: Every Wednesday, you can bring your lunch and listen to professors and invited guests discuss and receive feedback on preliminary research ideas.

5. LIBRARY: Our library located on the Nitze building 6th floor has an extensive number of resources available both on campus as well as online. If you can't find something you need, just let one of our librarians know.

6. OUR LOCATION: There's a reason why our campus is located in Bologna, Nanjing, and DC. These three cities are prime locations to find upcoming events about international topics, panel discussions, and more.




Can I get a head start?

Absolutely! At Johns Hopkins SAIS, we have pre-term classes throughout the year where you can take the Online Principles of Economics course to fulfill your microeconomics or macroeconomics requirement. This is a great way to transition to your move in DC during the summer before starting your full load of classes in the fall. 

To find out more about other pre-term courses, click here.

Rebecca Chun
Admissions Coordinator

Monday, October 16, 2017

2018 Admissions Guideline: Why you should consider the early notification application

As you get your application together for the 2018 admissions, I'm sure you've questioned whether or not you should consider the early notification deadline or to take more time preparing for the regular deadline. Although the regular deadline gives you the benefit of having more cushion time, I wanted to share some of the benefits for applying to the early notification enrollment option that you might not have known about.


1. Anyone who gets accepted in the early notification pool receives a half tuition fellowship

What that means: It means, you automatically get a fellowship (or scholarship) added to your tuition just for being accepted into the early notification pool. 

2. No one gets rejected

What that means: Any applicants applying through the early notification enrollment option either get accepted or deferred to regular decision pool. It's like a free second chance.

3. Get it out of the way

What that means: You're all done and can spend more time focusing on other things that you enjoy.

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So, what are you waiting for? Get your application together to apply to the early notification pool.


EARLY NOTIFICATION DEADLINE: November 1, 2017

Check out other important dates and deadlines here.


Rebecca Chun
Admissions Coordinator

Thursday, October 12, 2017

2018 Admissions Guideline: Standardized Tests

As you are getting your application together, I'm sure you are thinking a lot about the standardized tests and language competency exams. We get a lot of questions about them, so I want to demystify them for you.



Who's required to submit standardized test scores? 

The answer to this question depends on which degree program you choose to apply for. Applying to the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Masters of Arts in International Economics and Finance (MIEF), or Master of Arts (MA) program? Then standardized test scores as well as English competency exams such as the TOEFL or IELTS are required for non-native English speakers. Applying to the Master of Arts in Public Policy (MIPP) or Master of Arts in Global Policy (MAGP)? If so, the standardized test scores (GRE or GMAT) are strongly encouraged, but not required. However, the English competency is still required for non-native English speakers. The only exception for MA applicants is international students applying to Bologna, who have to complete an interview instead.

If English is NOT your native language, (or in the case of bilingual students, your dominant language is not English), you will need to submit an English competency exam such as the TOEFL or IELTS. If English is NOT your native language, (or in the case of bilingual students, your dominant language is not English), but you hold an undergraduate degree granted by an accredited institution in a country where English is an official language and where English is the language of instruction, than you will not be required to submit your TOEFL scores. However, in the same case, but with a graduate degree, you will need the approval of the Office of Admissions to be exempt from submitting an English competency exam.

Do I take the GRE, GMAT, or LSAT? 

We’re perfectly happy to accept either the GRE or GMAT; however, we don't accept LSAT.


What is the minimum test score for the GRE or GMAT?

We don't have an arbitrary cut-off for our test scores. These scores can be a bit controversial, and it's not uncommon to hear people discuss the cultural bias of standardized test scores. So we recognize that strong candidates can perform poorly on standardized test scores, and we don't use a minimum test score as a baseline to eliminate candidates. 

We may reject someone with poor test scores, but that applicant was rejected because his/her application contained a series of weaknesses-not because of test scores alone.

To find the test score range from 2017 applicants, click here.

What is the minimum test score for the TOEFL/IELTS?


We do have minimums for these exams, but we don't do this so we have an easy way to eliminate applicants. We have a minimum score on the exam because we want to make sure that all of our students are well-prepared to succeed in our program. If we admitted an applicant with less than minimum scores, we would be doing a disservice to him/her, because we would know that they would be unable to keep up with the intensity of our program.

A TOEFL score of at least 600 for the paper-based exam, 250 for the computer based exam or 100 for the internet-based exam is required. Students who choose to submit the IELTS exam results must meet a minimum of 7.0.

To find the test score range from 2017 applicants, click here.


Can I take the GRE and GMAT multiple times without adversely affecting  my application?

The reviewer will not see that you've taken it multiple times. They will only see the best scores you've received.

We only consider the best sub-scores you receive in each category...

...even if they are from different test dates. Say you take the GRE three times, and each time you max out score-wise on a different section. We will use whichever quantitative score is best, whichever verbal score is best, and whichever analytical writing score is best, even if all three scores came from three different dates.


You might get your scores instantly, but we won't.

It takes up to 10 business days for our office to receive official GRE/TOEFL test scores (and potentially longer for GMAT and IELTS), even though the testing center will give you unofficial score results for the verbal and quantitative section on the same day. To ensure that your official test scores reach Johns Hopkins SAIS on time, you should take the appropriate examinations and request your official score reports at least a month before the deadline.

So, when planning for your application, make sure that you take the standardized exam well in advance of the application deadline to make sure we get your scores in time.


Make sure you check the important deadlines to make sure you don't miss any important dates!

Friday, October 6, 2017

2018 Admissions Guideline: Who do I contact?

As an Admissions Coordinator, one of the most common questions I get asked is "who do I contact to get more information about ______________?" Although most of the contact information is on our website, it takes a lot of time navigating the site to find the exact person or department, so for this post, I put together a list of contact information in one place to help you find the contact person for your questions. For general questions, you can always contact the Admissions Office and someone will be more than happy to help you; however, if you have a specific question and you want to talk to someone from a certain department, use this directory to get in touch with the right person.



Department
Telephone
Email

Admissions Office in DC


202.663.5700

Sais.dc.admissions@jhu.edu
Hopkins-Nanjing Center in DC

202.633.5800
SAIS Europe in Bologna
+39 051.29.17.811



Program
Coordinator
Telephone
Email

African Studies


Allison Janos

202.663.5676

American Foreign Policy

Starr Lee
202.663.5714
China Studies

Zhaojin Ji
202.663.5816
Conflict Management

Isabelle Talpain-Long
202.663-5745
Energy Resources & Environment

Jaime Warren
202.663.5786
European & Eurasian Studies

Cristina Benitez
202.663.5796
International Development

Ada Ho
Nicole Kazi
202.633.5943
International Economics

Savannah Altvater
202.633.7975
International Law & Organization

Tiffany Basciano
202.633.5982
International Political Economy

Starr Lee
202.633.5714
IR General, Global Theory & History, Canadian Studies

Starr Lee
202.663.5714
Japan Studies

Alexander Evans
202.663.5812
Korean Studies

Seo Ho Lee
202.663.5405
Language Studies

Jacqueline Manuel
202.633.5751
Latin American Studies

John McGeoch
202.633.5734
Middle East Studies

Allison Janos
202.633.5676
South Asia Studies

Isata Munu
202.633.7721
Southeast Asia Studies

Isata Munu
202.633.7721
Strategic Studies

Thayer McKell
202.663.5774
 

Rebecca Chun
Admissions Coordinator

Thursday, October 5, 2017

2018 Admissions Guideline: Degree Comparison Chart

With so many different great academic programs available at Johns Hopkins SAIS, it's hard to get a good grasp of all the information at once. Here's a comparison chart to get a quick glance at the different programs. Click on each program to get more information.


Degree
Campus
Duration
Entry Term
Typical Work Experience
Bologna,  Italy*
Washington, DC
Two academic years
Fall
0-4 years
Washington, DC
16 months
Fall
7-12 years (minimum 7 years)
Bologna, Italy
13 months
Summer
2-4 years
Bologna Italy
Two academic years
Fall
Spring
0-2 years
Washington, DC
11 months
Summer
0-2 years
Nanjing, China
Two academic years
Fall
0-2 years
Bologna, Italy
Washington, DC
One academic year
Fall
Spring
7-12 years
 (minimum 7 years)
Nanjing, China
One academic year
Fall
0-2 years
Nanjing, China
Bologna, Italy
Washington, DC
Four or five semesters
Fall
0-2 years
Bologna, Italy
One academic year
Fall
Spring
0-4 years
Bologna, Italy
Washington, DC
4-6 years
Fall
4-6 years

*SAIS Europe offers spring admission in the MA program on a space-available basis.
**HNC Certificate/MA requires at least one semester in Washington, DC.

OTHER ACADEMIC PROGRAMS:

Don't forget to check the deadline dates for each program!