Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Welcome to SAIS: GPP Edition

September 9 was a big day at Johns Hopkins SAIS: We welcomed the inaugural Master of Arts in Global Policy program (GPP) cohort to campus for their first residency.










The GPP is a sixteen-month degree designed to give experienced professionals a competitive edge in their careers. The program offers a convenient, alternating-weekend (Friday/Saturday) schedule that enables students to participate in a rigorous academic environment and maintain full-time employment. 

Residencies, which are essential components of the GPP, are intense, multi-day exercises that take students outside the standard classroom and challenge them to apply lessons learned from their coursework. On this particular residency, with instruction from former and current policymakers, including members of the U.S. Department State’s policy planning staff, the entering class of GPP students worked in small teams to research, write, and brief policy memos, with thirty-six hours to complete the assignment. 





For more pictures from the inaugural GPP residency, click here.  You can also visit the SAIS website to learn more about the GPP program.

Thanks for reading!

--Erin Skelly, Associate Director of Admissions

Thursday, September 24, 2015

Preparing Your Application: Class Visits

This is the second in a blog series discussing best practices for preparing your application for Johns Hopkins SAIS. Today, we'll be covering Class Visits.


When preparing to apply for graduate school, it's important to do your research. You can read as much about a program as you want, and you can read books and articles by the professors you hope to study under. All of that is a great start--in fact, if you've already done that, then you're ahead of the game in many aspects.

But how do you know if a program is a good fit for you? The best way to do that is to visit campus, to speak with current students, and most importantly, to visit a class.

Now, this isn't an actual component to the application process, so it may seem like an odd thing to include in a series about application preparation best practices, but think about it: the best way to get a feel for a program and how it fits your needs is to immerse yourself in it. And what better way to do that, than sit where other Johns Hopkins SAIS students sit? And it may spark some ideas for your Statement of Purpose--and if you can better envision yourself as a SAIS student by sitting in your class, it may also lend some clarity to the application process.

The Johns Hopkins SAIS DC campus is offering fall semester class visits now through November 20. To see available classes and to sign up, check out our Class Visit Schedule. Click on "Filter Calendar View" and select "Events" to see all the classes available. Take note--class visits must be scheduled a week in advance.

Thanks for reading!

--Erin Skelly, Associate Director of Admissions

This is the second in a blog series discussing best practices for preparing your application for Johns Hopkins SAIS. In our previous series post, we covered Letters of Recommendation.


More in this series
Letters of Recommendation
Interviews
Statement of Purpose
Standardized Tests
The Analytical Essay

Monday, September 21, 2015

Get a Taste of SAIS on Tuesday, Sept 22!


Do you want to know what it's like to be a student at SAIS, and to learn from one of our faculty experts?  You should attend one of our Taster Lectures this fall!

On Tuesday, September 22, we will have the pleasure of hosting David M. Lampton, director of SAIS China and the China Studies program at Johns Hopkins SAIS.  Even though Professor Lampton is a foremost expert on China, you don't have to be focused on China to attend--Professor Lampton's lecture is open to all prospective students.

For more information on the Taster Lecture Series and to RSVP, please click here.  We hope you'll join us!

If you would like to view other upcoming recruiting events for prospective students, you can check out our Recruiting Calendar.

Thanks for reading!

--Erin Skelly, Associate Director of Admissions

Friday, September 18, 2015

Preparing Your Application: Letters of Recommendation

This is the first in a blog series discussing best practices for preparing your application for Johns Hopkins SAIS.  Today, we'll be covering Letters of Recommendation.


The Johns Hopkins SAIS application process requires two (2) letters of recommendation, but we allow applicants to submit up to three letters of recommendation.  All letters of recommendation have to be submitted via the Apply Yourself recommendation system, so you'll need to start your application ahead of time to get your references and their contact info into the system, so they can get started on your reference letters.

Many potential students ask us, who should write my letters?  Should they be professional, or academic?  One of each?

First things first: we don't have a preference for one type over another.  Rather than acquiring specific types of recommendations, you should look to solicit letters of recommendations from individuals who can best speak to your suitability as a international relations professional.  For those who have been out of school for a few years, that may mean all your recommendations are professional.  If you're younger, that might mean all your recommendations are academic in nature.

When you approach someone about writing a recommendation letter for you, make sure they know about the program.  Be prepared to tell them why Johns Hopkins SAIS interests you, and why it's a good fit for you.  If you want them to focus on specific items in the recommendation, make sure they know.  If you haven't seen this individual in some time, you may want to spend some time catching up, and filling him or her in on what you've been doing lately, and what you plan to do after graduate school.  You may want to give them a copy of your resume to consider as they are writing the recommendation.

You should also ask them well in advance.  You never know how many other people are asking them for letters of recommendation, and you need to give your recommender enough time to write a strong recommendation--you definitely don't want them rushing through it!

To start your online application, and to start the recommendation process, visit the How to Apply section of our website.

Thanks for reading!
Erin Skelly, Associate Director of Admissions

Do you have any questions about the recommendation process?  Ask us below in the comments section!

More in this series
Class Visits
Interviews
Statement of Purpose
Standardized Tests
The Analytical Essay

Thursday, September 3, 2015

What Happens at Newseum...

... well, it doesn't always stay at Newseum.

Last week, several SAIS students had the opportunity to meet with Nobel Prize Winner Malala Yusafzai at the Newseum in Washington, DC.

Photo courtesy of  SAIS MA student DaQuan Lawrence

Thanks for reading!

--Erin Skelly, Associate Director of Admissions