Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Happy Holidays from SAIS Admissions!

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We would like to wish you all a happy holiday season!
In regards to the holiday season: Please be advised that the Admissions and Financial Aid offices will be closed for the winter holidays beginning December 24, 2012 and will re-open on Wednesday, January 2, 2013.
(But we will still be blogging and tweeting, so make sure you follow us or check back for more updates.)
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

This post is the first in an on-going series highlighting SAIS concentrations.
One our most popular concentrations, International Development (IDEV) is considered a “Global Theme” at SAIS, providing an interdisciplinary approach to the study of developing countries.  While the number of students concentrating in IDEV is capped, many students in other concentrations take IDEV courses as electives and participate in IDEV events and extracurricular activities.
What draws students to the IDEV program at SAIS?  I think Deborah Brautigam, Director of International Development and SAIS professor, says it best. Watch on YouTube here.

To hear Professor Brautigam discuss IDEV further, click here.
The International Development concentration requires that each IDEV student select an IDEV track: Finance and Development, Politics and Governance, or Human Development.  IDEV students complete 7 IDEV-approved courses, 3 of which fall within their selected track.  Beyond the economics courses courses required for the SAIS M.A., many IDEV students choose to pursue a specialization either in economics or emerging markets.
Beyond academics, the IDEV concentration offers many professional development and learning opportunities outside the classroom, such as the bi-weekly Development Roundtable, alumni tertulias, the annual intersession field practicum trip, the summer internship program, and Perspectives, the IDEV student journal.
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Saturday, December 14, 2013

Student Spotlight: Julian Palma

For this post, we’ve interviewed Julian Palma, a first-year SAIS M.A. student from Colombia concentrating in Conflict Management. After graduating from Lynn University in 2007 with a degree in business, Julian spent time working for Merrill Lynch, the Colombian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the Centre for Human Rights in South Africa.

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What made you want to pursue international relations professionally, and what are your post-SAIS professional goals?
Watching Colombia transform from the brink of a failed state to an emerging market, in less than a decade, was powerful. I wanted to be part of the young and motivated group of professionals who were pushing for this change to happen. I started researching how post-conflict societies were shaping policy, implementing aid, and promoting growth. With this in mind, I joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and my first assignment was in South Africa.

After SAIS, I would like to continue working with development in emerging markets. I’m specifically interested in exploring how entrepreneurship, in a broader sense microfinance, SME’s and social entrepreneurship impact employment creation and economic development.
When considering graduate school, what was appealing about SAIS?
  1. Academics—I was looking for a holistic education in an international setting that allowed me to find the intersection between economics, conflict management, development and foreign languages.
  2. Location—After working in Africa and Latin America, I wanted to experience international affairs from the center of political power. If you want to have an effect on international relations, Washington D.C. is the place to be.
  3. Faculty and students—At SAIS, having access to professors is having access to real-world practitioners. Similarly, the unique experiences students bring into the classroom are world-class.
  4. Research—Photography is one of my passions in life. I’ve always wanted to connect photography with international affairs, and The Protection Project, at the Foreign Policy Institute provided a space for me to use my photos for human rights awareness.
How has the support of COLFUTRO helped realize your dream of pursuing graduate studies at SAIS?
Before applying to SAIS, I was certain about two things: my determination to attend graduate school and the cost of tuition. Financing of graduate school is just as relevant as the application process. COLFUTURO is a private-public sector initiative aimed at helping Colombian students finance their graduate studies abroad. It was extremely satisfying to know that there were opportunities out there available to ease the financial burden of a U.S. education. COLFUTURO has been perhaps the most important tool in bridging the gap between my ambition and my reality today.
What advice would you give other prospects from your home country seeking to prepare for graduate study in international affairs?
My former boss once told me: the best things in life, take time. During the application process, there will be instances where you would want to give up. It happened to me, but doing your research will help materialize your process: talk to current students and alumni, engage with admissions, and if you can, attend information sessions. Have an open mind; apply to several schools; know that you will be fascinated yet challenged by the diverse student body. While the biggest constraint may be the cost, remember it is an investment you are making in yourself. Look out for opportunities with COLFUTURO, organizations such as OAS and other private fellowships. When telling your story, be creative and passionate, bring up something unexpected. For example, I linked how my photography skills were an empowering tool for international relations. Oh and read The Economist!
What are some of the courses you’re taking and skills you’re learning right now that will help you in your professional career?
My favorite course at SAIS this semester is Conflict in Africa Analysis. I’m also taking two of the requirements for the International Economics program: Macroeconomics and International Trade theory. This proves how SAIS prepares futures leaders with both, the necessary quantitative and analytical skills to succeed in any endeavor, be multilateral, public or private sector. Additionally, there are skills courses offered through career services and online in partnership with the Harvard Business School. This semester, I strengthened my excel skills and I participated in a consulting workshop with Joe Dougherty from Dalberg, which I found exceptionally beneficial.
Thanks for reading!

– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Friday, December 6, 2013

The Fall 2013 Staff Ride

In August, we posted about this fantastic educational tradition at SAIS.  Take a look at the Fall 2013 SAIS Staff Ride in Gettysburg, PA:
 
 
Does this get you excited about what else you can learn at SAIS?  You can get more information on the SAIS MA degree at our on-campus information session tonight.  For more info and to register, click here.
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions
 

Monday, November 18, 2013

This Week at SAIS: November 18-22

We’ve got some great stuff going on at campus this week!

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18
“I Am Here Until Development Comes: Displacement, Demolitions and Property Rights in Urbanizing Abuja”
12:30 p.m. – Room 736, Bernstein-Offit Building, 1717 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Carl LeVan, assistant professor at the American University School of International Service, and Josiah Olubowale, a Ph.D. candidate in cultural studies at the University of the West Indies at St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago, will discuss this topic.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19
“History in 3-D: Ancient and Modern Examples of Modeling Knowledge, East and West”
12:30 p.m. – Room 812, Rome Building, 1619 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Angela Lorenz, artist and author, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS Energy, Resources and Environment Program at saisees@jhu.edu. 

“Beyond the Fog of War: Personal Stories of Conscience and Accountability From Iraq
4 p.m. – Rome Building Auditorium, 1619 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Kirk Johnson, author of To Be a Friend Is Fatal and former USAID staff member in Iraq; Leslie Cockburn, journalist, author of Baghdad Solitaire and documentary filmmaker; and Azar Nafisi (moderator), executive director of SAIS Cultural Conversations, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to SAIS Cultural Conversations at laustin@jhu.edu. 

“North Korea’s Changing Society: Insights From a Young North Korean Defector”
6 p.m. – Kenney Auditorium, Nitze Building, 1740 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Seongmin Lee, a North Korean defector, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the U.S.-Korea Institute at SAIS here. NOTE: The speaker’s comments will be off the record.

“Turkey and the Regional/ Global Energy Geopolitics”
5:30 p.m. – Room 806, Rome Building, 1619 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Memduh Karakullukçu, vice chairman and president of Global Relations Forum, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the Energy, Resources and Environment Program at saisereglobal@jhu.edu.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20
“The Challenges of Democratic Transition in Tunisia”
12:30 p.m. – Rome Building Auditorium, 1619 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Wassim Daghrir, an associate professor at the University of Sousse, Tunisia’s English Department and a Fulbright Scholar at Villanova University, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS Conflict Management Program here. 

“Inside South Africa’s Transition: Challenges of Post-Liberation Governance”
4:30 p.m. – Room 500, Bernstein-Offit Building, 1717 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Barry Gilder, director of operation of the Mapungubwe Institute, will discuss this topic. 

“The IMF’s New Economic Outlook Report for Central Asia and the Caucasus With Special Focus on Armenia”
5:30 p.m. – Rome Building Auditorium, 1619 Massachusetts Ave., NW(A reception will precede the forum at 5 p.m.)
Juha Kahkonen, director of the International Monetary Fund’s Department for Middle East, Caucasus and Central Asia; Mark Horton, assistant director of the IMF’s Department for Middle East and Central Asia, division chief for South Caucasus and Turkmenistan, and mission chief for Armenia; and Thomas de Waal, senior associate in the Russia and Eurasia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS Central Asia-Caucasus Institute at saiscaciforums@jhu.edu.

“Technology as a Spark for Growth”
5 p.m. – Kenney Auditorium, Nitze Building, 1740 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Google, will discuss this topic at the annual Rostov Lecture on International Affairs. NOTE: Attendance of this event is by invitation only. However, the lecture is open to the media for coverage. Members of the media must RSVP to fklubes@jhu.edu or 202.663.5626. 
There will be a live webcast for this event available here. 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21
“Continued Crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo: A Conversation With U.S. Special Envoy Russ Feingold”
9:30 a.m. – Kenney Auditorium, Nitze Building, 1740 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Russ Feingold, the U.S. special envoy to Africa’s Great Lakes region, will be the featured speaker at this event. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS Conflict Management Program at itlong@jhu.edu.
NOTE: Russ Feingold’s comments will be off the record.

“The U.S., Japan and the Changing Middle East”
4:30 p.m. – Room 806, Rome Building, 1619 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Kent Calder, director of the SAIS Japan and Korea Studies programs and the Edwin O. Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies, will discuss this event. Members of the public should RSVP to the Reischauer Center at reischauer@jhu.edu. 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22
“The Mysterious Meritefnut: A Missing Persons Case From the 7th Century B.C.”
6:30 p.m. – Rome Building Auditorium, 1619 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Jeremy Pope, assistant professor in the College of William and Mary’s Department of History, will discuss this topic.
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Friday, November 15, 2013

The Last Taster Lecture: Francisco González

Thanks to everyone who attended our last taster lecture for the fall semester, which was held this past Wednesday and featured Francisco González, Riordan Roett Senior Associate Professor of Latin American Studies.  Professor González gave a lecture titled, “"The Perils of Long-Term Forecasting: Why Have Investors Been Selling Brazil and Buying Mexico?”
If you couldn’t make it to the lecture, but would like to see what all the fuss is about, you are in luck - we happen to have a video of the last taster lecture of the fall right here:
 
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Thursday, November 14, 2013



 
 
 
 



The SAIS International Dinner is one of my favorite traditions - I go every year - and it’s very popular with the students (and alums!) as well.  All the different cultural clubs prepare foods representing their culture to share with the SAIS community, students dress up in traditional cultural garb, and there’s even an international talent show! 
This year’s International Dinner was also the kick-off the SAISCorps’ and SAIS Veteran’s Network food drive benefiting the Capital Area Food Bank, which will continue on-campus until the students leave for Thanksgiving break.  So if you’ll be visiting campus in the next week, why not bring along a little something for the food drive?
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Monday, November 11, 2013

This Week at SAIS: November 11-16, 2013

We have a big week at SAIS - lots of events are going on all week long!  If you’re in the DC area, you should definitely come to campus and check out one of the public events that interests you.
And while you’re on campus, if you’re applying for the MA for Fall 2014 enrollment, you should also sign up for an MA application interview.  We’re only offering interviews through early December, so sign up here before it’s too late.  Also, if you’re interested in visiting a class, you should do so soon – fall semester classes will be wrapping up very soon!
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12
Screening of “Under the Same Sun”
9:30 a.m. – Kenney Auditorium, Nitze Building
SAIS will screen “Under the Same Sun,” a film set in the near future that looks back on how peace was made in 2013 between Israel and Palestine. John Marks, founder and president of Search for Common Ground and Common Ground Productions; Steven Krubiner, chief of staff of J Street; and Ghaith Al-Omari, executive director at the American Task Force on Palestine, will discuss the film following the screening. Members of the public should RSVP to Search for Common Ground, the event’s co-host, here.

“What Went Wrong? Why Decisions and Policies Misfire in an Uncertain World
12:30 p.m. – Kenney Auditorium, Nitze Building
Mark White, associate practitioner-in-residence in the SAIS International Economics Program and recipient of the school’s 2013 Max M. Fisher Prize for Excellence in Teaching, will discuss this topic during the annual Fisher Lecture. Members of the public should RSVP to saisevents@jhu.edu. 

“Can Expanding Rooftop Solar Coexist With Traditional Electric Utilities?”
5 p.m. – Kenney Auditorium, Nitze Building
Bob Gibson, vice president for education and communication at the Solar Electric Power Association; Bill Murray, director of public policy at Dominion Virginia Power; Rick Morgan, former commissioner of the D.C. Public Service Commission; and Robert Margolis, senior analyst at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS Energy, Resources and Environment Program at saisereglobal@jhu.edu. 

“How to Turn Russia Against Assad”
5 p.m. – Room 806, Rome Building
Samuel Charap, senior fellow for Russia and Eurasia at the International Institute for Strategic Studies, and Jeremy Shapiro, visiting fellow in the Foreign Policy Program at the Brookings Institution and senior adviser to the U.S. assistant secretary of State for Europe and Eurasia, will discuss this topic.

“Georgia’s Domestic and Regional Economic Agenda: Realities and Prospects for Future”
5:30 p.m. – Rome Building Auditorium 
(A reception will precede the forum at 5 p.m.)
Giorgi Pertaia, head of the Georgian National Investment Agency; George Bachiashvili, CEO of the Georgian Co-Investment Fund; and Mamuka Bakhtadze, CEO of Georgian Railway, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS Central Asia-Caucasus Institute at saiscaciforums@jhu.edu.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13
“Russia and Its Neighbors: Does the ‘Post-Soviet Space’ Still Exist?”
12:30 p.m. – Room 535, Rome Building
Jeffrey Mankoff, deputy director and fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ Russia and Eurasia Program, will discuss this topic. 

“In Line Behind a Billion People”
5 p.m. – Rome Auditorium Building
Damien Ma, a political analyst at Chicago University’s Paulson Institute, and William Adams, a senior international economist at PNC Bank and a SAIS graduate, will discuss this topic. 

“The Transformation of the Automotive Industry: The Experience of Renault Group”
5:30 p.m. – Kenney Auditorium, Nitze Building
Dominique Thormann, executive vice president and chief financial officer of Renault Group, chairman and CEO of Renault Credit International (RCI) Banque and a SAIS graduate, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP here.
“The Perils of Long-Term Forecasting: Why Have Investors Been Selling Brazil and Buying Mexico?”6:00 p.m. – Room 500, Bernstein-Offit Building
Dr. Francisco E. González, the Riordan Roett Associate Professor of Latin American Studies at SAIS, will offer a taster lecture for prospective students 
on this topic.  Prospective students should RSVP here.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14
“Lessons for Others? International Perspectives on the Franco-German Relationship 50 Years After the Elysee Treaty”
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. – Kenney Auditorium, Nitze Building
A variety of speakers will discuss lessons learned, good practices, challenges and opportunities that may be drawn from the Franco-German relationship and applied to other bilateral relationships around the world. For a complete conference agenda and to RSVP, click here.
“History, Sovereignty and International Law: China’s East China Sea and South China Sea Territorial Disputes and Implications for Taiwan”
4:30 p.m. – Room 806, Rome Building
Jacques deLisle, professor of law and political science at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the Asia Program at the Foreign Policy Research Institute, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies at reischauer@jhu.edu. 

“Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity and Poverty”
4:30 p.m. – Rome Building Auditorium
James Robinson, the David Florence Professor of Government at Harvard University and a faculty associate at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the Bernard L. Schwartz Globalization Initiative at sais_schwartz@jhu.edu. 

“The Poor, the Political Economy and the Role of Patient Capital”
5:30 p.m. – Kenney Auditorium, Nitze Building
Jacqueline Novogratz, founder and CEO of Acumen, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP here.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15
“A Voice Behind the Drones: One Civilian Survivor Speaks Out”
9 a.m. – Room 500, Bernstein-Offit Building
Faisal bin Ali Jaber, a Yemeni government employee who lost family members from drone strikes; Alka Pradhan, a U.S. counterterrorism counsel at the U.K.-based NGO Reprieve; and Cori Crider, strategic director of Reprieve’s Abuses in Counterterrorism Team, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS International Law and Organizations Program at saisilo@jhu.edu.
Thanks for reading!

Sunday, October 27, 2013

Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia - Oh, My!

The Admissions Office has a big week on the road this week.  We’ll be visiting schools in three different states.
In Pennsylvania, an admissions officer will be representing SAIS at graduate school fairs atDickinson CollegeGettysburg College, and Franklin & Marshall.
And all week long, SAIS - along with our colleagues from SIPA, Fletcher, Georgetown, and Princeton WWS - will be visiting multiple colleges through Maryland and Virginia.  You can see the full list of schools we’ll be visiting on our recruiting calendar.
Also, alumni will be representing SAIS at the Seattle Idealist Fair on Monday.
We hope you can come out and meet us while we’re on the road! We’ll be happy to answer any questions you have about SAIS and the application process.
If you’re in the DC metro area, we’re also hosting an on-campus MA information session this Friday. And if you’re attending the information session, you should sign up for an application interview, too!  We’re only offering interviews until early December, so you should do it now, before it’s too late.  Fall 2014 applicants can sign up for an interview here.
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Monday, October 21, 2013

SAIS is coming to Sunny California!



Johns Hopkins SAIS, along with many of our colleagues from the other APSIA schools, will be in California this week at various APSIA Graduate School Forums:
Can’t come to an in-person session?  We’ll also be conducting a virtual information session this week.  For more info, click here.
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Friday, October 18, 2013

The Week Ahead at SAIS: October 21-25, 2013

Did you know that SAIS hosts numerous events each week, many of which are open to the public?  There are even more events that are only open to SAIS students, facult, and staff.  The events and speakers on campus are an important part of the SAIS student experience, adding another dimension to a SAIS education. 
If you’ll be in the DC area next week, you should check out some of the great (and open to the public) events going on at SAIS!
MONDAY, OCTOBER 21
“Emerging Powers or New Powers?”
3 p.m. – Room 500, Bernstein-Offit Building
Barbara Woodward, director general of economic and consular at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office of the United Kingdom, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS Center for Transatlantic Relations here.

“Rare Earth Elements”
6 p.m. – Rome Building Auditorium
Leigh Hendrix, associate at Goldwyn Global Strategies, LLC; Marc Humphries, specialist in energy and mineral policy at the Congressional Research Service; and Michael Mazza, research fellow in foreign and defense policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute, will discuss chemical elements that are critical for mobile phones, laptops, green technologies and defense systems. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS International Development Program here.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22
“Human Security and Security Sector Reform in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: New Research and Approaches”
9:30 a.m. – Kenny Auditorium, Nitze Building
Jocelyn Kelly, director of the Women in War Program for the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, and Lena Slachmuijlder, vice president of programs at Search for Common Ground, will discuss this topic.

“Food Security and Sociopolitical Stability”
10 a.m. – Rome Building Auditorium
Christopher Barrett, the Stephen B. and Janice G. Ashley Professor of Applied Economics and Management and an international professor of agriculture at Cornell University; Emmy Simmons, former USAID assistant administrator for economic growth, agriculture and trade; and Richard Engel, director of the Environment and Natural Resources Program at the National Intelligence Council, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVPhere.

“The U.S., Japan and the Asian Development Bank”
4:30 p.m. – Room 500, Bernstein-Offit Building
Robert Orr, U.S. executive director of the Asian Development Bank, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies atreischauer@jhu.edu.

“Countering Violent Extremism”
4 p.m. – Rome Building Auditorium
Azar Nafisi, executive director of SAIS Cultural Conversations and SAIS Foreign Policy Institute (FPI) fellow, and Mahnaz Afkhami, president and founder of the Women’s Learning Partnership for Rights, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the FPI at ckunkel@jhu.edu.

“Can the EU Make a Comeback? Prospects and Pitfalls”
6 p.m. – Room 806, Rome Building
Charles Kupchan, Whitney Shepardson Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and professor of international affairs in the Department of Government at Georgetown University’s Walsh School of Foreign Service, will discuss this topic.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23
“The Medical Humanitarian Action of Doctors Without Borders”
12:30 p.m. – Rome Building Auditorium
Meinie Nicolai, president of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins San Frontières (MSF), will discuss this topic. This event is being held in memory of Hélène de Beir, a SAIS graduate who, while serving as an aid worker for MSF, was killed in Afghanistan along with four colleagues.
Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS International Development Program here.

NOTE: SAIS will also host a live Webcast of the event accessible here.
“A Coup in Bamako: How Mali’s Government Lost and Regained Political Legitimacy, 2012-13”
12:30 p.m. – Room 736, Bernstein-Offit Building
Bruce Whitehouse, assistant professor of anthropology at Lehigh University, will discuss this topic.

“Lost Enlightenment: Central Asia’s Golden Age From the Arab Conquest to Tamerlane”
5:30 p.m. – Rome Building Auditorium
(A reception will precede the forum at 5 p.m.)
S. Frederick Starr, chairman of the SAIS Central Asia-Caucasus Institute (CACI); Kent Calder, director of the SAIS Japan and Korea Studies programs and the Edwin O. Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies; and Grant Smith (moderator), SAIS CACI fellow and former U.S. ambassador to Tajikistan, will discuss Starr’s new book, Lost Enlightenment: Central Asia’s Golden Age From the Arab Conquest to Tamerlane. Members of the public should RSVP to CACI at caci2@jhu.edu.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24
“Geopolitical Implications of Gas Development in the Eastern Mediterranean”
12 p.m. – Rome Building Auditorium
Zeynep Dereli, managing director for APCO Worldwide, will discuss the topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS Energy, Resources and Environment Program atsaisereglobal@jhu.edu.

“Mongolia and the United States: A Diplomatic History”
4:30 p.m. – Room 806, Rome Building
Jonathan Addleton, former United States ambassador to Mongolia, will discuss this event. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies atreischauer@jhu.edu.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25
“A Return to Splendid Isolationism or a Continuing Global Role for Britain?”
11 a.m. – Room 500, Bernstein-Offit Building
Fiona Hill, director of the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution; James Kariuki, counselor and head of the Politics, Economics and Communications Group at the British Embassy in Washington, D.C.; Matthias Matthijs, SAIS assistant professor of international political economy; and Tim Oliver, TAPIR Fellow at the SAIS Center for Transatlantic Relations (CTR), will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to CTR here.
We hope we’ll see you on campus at an event this week - thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Thursday, October 10, 2013

The Road to Global Prosperity


Thanks to everyone who came out last night for our Taster Lecture last night with American Foreign Policy Program Director Michael Mandelbaum, who gave a lecture titled, “The Road to Global Prosperity.”

If you missed last night (or last month’s Taster Lecture with P. Terrence Hopmann), you’ve got one more chance to see a SAIS professor in action. Next month, our Taster Lecture will be given by Francisco Gonzalez, who teaches in our Latin American Studies Program. You won’t want to miss it!

For more information at the RSVP, click here.

Thanks for reading!

– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Monday, September 30, 2013

Hello New York, Baltimore, and DC!

If you want to learn more about SAIS, this might be the week for you - we have events all along the East Coast this week, of all different sorts.
On Monday, September 30, a SAIS Admissions rep will be at the Baltimore Idealist Fair, and on Tuesday, October 1, we’ll be at the Washington, DC Idealist fair along with alums and current students.  These events are great if you’re just starting to explore your options for graduate school.
If you definitely know that you want to apply to IR grad school, and you’re already seriously considering SAIS, you might want to attend an on-campus information session - and we just happen to have one scheduled for this Friday!
Also, all week long, we have a SAIS Admissions rep traveling throughout upstate NY, visiting various colleges and participating in graduate school fairs.  To see where SAIS will be in New York this week, check out our recruiting calendar.
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Tuesday, September 24, 2013



 

Hello from Bogota, Columbia!
Sidney Jackson, Director of Admissions at SAIS, is currently recruiting in South America, and he sent these pics to us from his first visit at Universidad Externado.
You can see where else Sidney will be recruiting this week by visiting our recruiting calendar.
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Sunday, September 22, 2013

Student Spotlight: Sara O’Rourke

For our spotlight this week, we’ve interviewed Sara O'Rourke, a second-year M.A. student concentrating in Conflict Management.  She received her A.B. in Social Studies and French from Harvard in 2009.  Prior to enrolling in SAIS, Sara worked as a teacher and as a travel researcher/writer.
What made you decide to pursue a career in international relations?
As a junior in college, I became fascinated with international affairs while studying abroad in Paris and researching my thesis on the political representation of Muslims in France. I also had the chance to travel in both Morocco and Egypt, where I became interested in the challenges facing women in Muslim countries. After graduation, I decided to move to the U.A.E., where I taught social studies and history at an international school, and coached the Varsity boys’ and girls’ soccer teams. While I was living in Dubai, Arab Spring erupted, and I saw the impact it had on my students and their families. I became passionate about the role of women in post-conflict societies, as well as within broader economic and political development. While at SAIS, I have been drawn in particular to the power of the private sector to empower women—and societies—economically. 
Can you tell us about your concentration and why you chose it?
Conflict Management focuses on the functions and tools to necessary to address conflict, from successful negotiation techniques to effective approaches to reconstruction. I chose the concentration because I believed it would equip me with the skills and knowledge I needed to contribute to post-conflict economic and political development, particularly in the Middle East. I was lucky enough to be selected as a first-year to participate in the Conflict Management Field Trip to Tunisia, where we spent 10 days on the ground interviewing influential politicians, diplomats, professors, activists, and students about the Tunisian Revolution and its aftermath. I was responsible for reporting on the role of discussions about women’s rights, as well as the role of women, in post-revolution Tunisia. In our capstone course, Professor Zartman’s Negotiation Practicum, we have weekly guest lectures from some of the most talented negotiators in the field, and then participate in negotiation simulations of our own. We will all then produce a term paper exploring the purpose and effectiveness of a particular negotiation tool.
What are some of the courses you’ve taken and specific skills you’ve learned that will help you in your career?
I have designed my curriculum mostly around those economics courses that will best prepare me for a career in international business and finance, with a focus on private sector development and post-conflict reconstruction.
The foundational economics and finance courses I have taken—Micro, Macro, Trade, Monetary, and International Financial Markets—have given me a strong base from which to evaluate general macroeconomic trends and with which to analyze evolving financial institutions. The business-focused courses I have taken—Private Equity in Emerging Markets; Corporate Finance; Multinational Corporate Finance; Enterprise, Regulation and Development; and Business and Human Rights—have not only equipped me with the tools (e.g., financial modeling) necessary to quantitatively evaluate new business projects, but also the exposure needed to analyze the social, political and economic impact of private sector initiatives in developing countries. Finally, I believe the negotiation techniques I have learned in the Practicum will serve me well as I embark on a career in consulting.
Can you tell us about SAIS Global Women in Leadership and how it was started?
I started SAIS Global Women in Leadership in the fall of 2012 because I believed that SAIS was uniquely positioned to contribute to the growing conversation on the increasingly important role of women in leadership, both at home and abroad. As an institution, SAIS–as a global thought leader–has been at the forefront of the next big issue, whether it be economic development or food security, and its strategic partnerships with all institutions in sectors–private, public, and social–have allowed SAIS to adapt to the increasingly interdisciplinary nature of international relations.  I thought it only natural that SAIS should take the lead on discussions regarding the role of women in leadership in both developing countries as well as developed societies.
To that end, SAIS Global Women in Leadership will host the first annual Global Women in Leadership Conference, titled “A New Economic Landscape: Promoting Women in Emerging Markets,” on Friday, April 12th. The conference will explore the role of women in emerging markets, facilitate a better understanding of the key issues that women face around the world, and expand the personal and professional networks of our next generation of leaders. It will be the first SAIS conference on women and leadership developed and managed by current SAIS students. It is also the first event to welcome over 150 students from schools in the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA) network, which includes 30 graduate schools nationwide, as well as business and law programs on the East Coast.
Further, SWGL hosts a bi-monthly Luncheon Series, which are organized around substantive themes such as women and health, women and entrepreneurship, and women in international security, and invite experienced speakers from all sectors to comment on new solutions to challenges facing women globally, as well as new strategies for professional and personal success. Our hope is that by interacting with accomplished and engaging speakers, attendees will not only come away from events more informed, but also more inspired to take action in their careers and their communities.
What are your plans after graduation?
After graduation, I will be joining McKinsey & Company, a management consulting firm, as an Associate in their Chicago office. I was a Summer Associate with them this past summer, and absolutely loved my time working on corporate strategy for a major health care player. I will be returning as a generalist, so will get the chance to work on diverse function areas in a variety of industries. I look forward to developing the private sector skills and exposure necessary to one day contribute to private sector development and women’s empowerment in developing countries.
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions
To read previous entries in our Student Spotlight series, please click here.

Saturday, September 21, 2013

Taster Lecture Featuring Professor Terrence Hopmann.

Thanks to everyone who came out for our taster lecture this past Thursday with SAIS Professor P. Terrence Hopmann.

 

If you missed Professor Hopmann’s lecture, we’ll be having two more taster lectures this fall. For more info and to RSVP, please click here.

Thanks for reading!

– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Friday, September 20, 2013

Something new is just around the corner…

What am I talking about?  For as long as I’ve been at SAIS, applicants have been asking me about the possibility of an interview.  In the past, we haven’t been able to accommodate such requests at the DC Admissions Office (even though the SAIS Europe campus has been conducting interviews for international applicants for quite some time now).
But that’s about to change very soon – keep on the lookout for an announcement soon about optional MA interviews at the DC campus!  Applicants will be able to sign up for interviews in the near future, and we hope you’ll take advantage of that opportunity.  More info to come.
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Monday, September 16, 2013

Get a Taste of SAIS this Thursday!

This week, the SAIS Admissions Office will be hosting the first lecture in our regular fall Taster Lecture Series, which gives potential students a chance to experience what a SAIS class lecture is like.
Our first lecturer of Fall 2014 is none other than P. Terrence Hopmann, Director of the SAIS Conflict Management program.  On Thursday, September 19, Professor Hopmann will be giving a lecture titled, “Regional International Organizations and Conflict Management: The Case of the Organization for Security in Europe since the end of the Cold War.”
For more information and to RSVP (and to see other lectures in our fall series), click here.
Want more opportunities to see what it’s like to be a SAIS student?  We also offer class visits, or you can speak with a current student during our walk-in hours, Monday-Friday, 2-5 pm.
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Get a Taste of SAIS this Thursday!

This week, the SAIS Admissions Office will be hosting the first lecture in our regular fall Taster Lecture Series, which gives potential students a chance to experience what a SAIS class lecture is like.
Our first lecturer of Fall 2014 is none other than P. Terrence Hopmann, Director of the SAIS Conflict Management program.  On Thursday, September 19, Professor Hopmann will be giving a lecture titled, “Regional International Organizations and Conflict Management: The Case of the Organization for Security in Europe since the end of the Cold War.”
For more information and to RSVP (and to see other lectures in our fall series), click here.
Want more opportunities to see what it’s like to be a SAIS student?  We also offer class visits, or you can speak with a current student during our walk-in hours, Monday-Friday, 2-5 pm.
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Coming to a city near you!

We’re coming to the end of the second week of the semester, which means two things: 1) add/drop period is over, and our students are locking in their final registration for the semester, and 2) SAIS Admissions is taking our show on the road!
We’ve already had two on-campus M.I.P.P. info sessions, and we’ll be having our first on-campus M.A. session tomorrow (Friday, September 13) evening (for more info or to RSVP, go here).  But starting next week, we’ll doing recruiting trips around the country (no, the globe!), and we might be coming to somewhere near you soon.
Next week, we’re going to be in both the Big Apple and the Mini Apple, among other places.
That’s right, we’ll be in New York City for the annual Idealist Graduate School Fair onMonday, September 16.  Several alums will be representing SAIS at this graduate fair, so stop by and learn more about SAIS.  Click here for more information and a link to RSVP.
Also on Monday, September 16, we’ll be in the “Mini Apple” - in Minneapolis and St. Paul, MN - to kick off a week-long tour of recruiting events at colleges throughout Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Illinois.  Even though these events are hosted at college campuses, they are open to the public. 
To see our full list of recruiting events next week, please visit our recruiting calendar.  We hope to see you at an event soon!
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Visiting SAIS? Maybe you should attend a class!



If you’re planning on visiting the SAIS campus soon, why not make the most of it and attend a class? Attending a class is a great way to see what it’s really like to be a SAIS student and to sample the intellectual offerings at SAIS.

It’s easy to set it up - just visit our online class calendar to view the available classes on the day of your visit, choose one, and sign up! If you don’t already have a MySAIS VIP username and password, you’ll be prompted to create one when you register.

A word to the wise – we recommend that you sign up well in advance of your visit, if possible. Each class has limited space for visitors, and if you wait too long, your preferred class might be full. (But also, be considerate of others and only sign up for the class(es) you will actually attend.)

Looking forward to seeing you on campus sometime soon.

Thanks for reading!

– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Thursday, September 5, 2013

SAIS on Syria

Syria is all over the news these days, and SAIS faculty have published some great articles recently on the Syria crisis.
The New York Times Online
Forcing Obama’s Hand in Syria” by Vali Nasr, dean of SAIS

The Wall Street Journal
The Stakes on the Syria Vote” by Eliot Cohen, director of the Strategic Studies Program 
(online subscription required)

The Washington Post
Syria Will Require More Than Cruise Missiles” by Eliot Cohen, director of the Strategic Studies Program

Foreign Policy
Advice From Clausewitz: Get a Strategy for Syria” by Tom Mahnken, senior research professor of Strategic Studies 

Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Sunday, September 1, 2013

Italian Student Visas

Right around this time of year, there are always LOTS of questions about the process of getting Italian Student Visas.  Some students are traveling over the summer, so they have very specific time frames to work with; some students have had bad experiences trying to get student visas before; and some students just like to have their ducks all in a row.  So what more appropriate than a post about getting Italian Student Visas?
We recently hosted an online webinar about obtaining Italian visas.  If you missed the live version, we have a recorded version right here, complete with a question-and-answer session at the end.
Much of the information covered in our webinar can also be found on our Visa Information page.
I strongly recommend using the SAIS visa service (NOTE: the deadline to submit your materials is May 20).  If you’ll be traveling over the summer and need your passport, you may still be able to use the visa service (depending on your departure date).  If you use the visa service, just follow the instructions on the website.  We suggest that you get your materials to us before the deadline so we can review your visa application and materials before going to the consulate.
If you’re not using the visa service, here are a few notes to keep in mind:
  • All consulates are not created equal.  There are “rules” that each consulates follow, and they aren’t consistent from consulate to consulate, despite the fact that they all fall under the Italian government.  So make sure that you contact the consulate well in advance to verify what materials you’ll need and how long the process will take, and get the name of the person you speak with.  Some consulates require appointments and book up weeks in advance, so call early; some consulates may take weeks to process your application, so plan in advance. 

    My experience (anecdotal from students in years past) is that most of the Italian consulates are easy to work with, and they process visas quickly.  But if the person on the phone is difficult (or they don’t return your calls), it’s likely that working with them will be difficult as well.  (A word to the wise: the NYC is notoriously difficult and is to be avoided at all costs.)  In such a case, you’re welcome to go to the Italian consulate in Washington, DC.
  • Make sure all your financial docs are notarized.  This doesn’t apply to your financial aid award notice, but it DOES apply to the Affidavit of Support, if you have one.  All banks have a notary, and services are usually free if you won an account at the bank - just ask them to notarize the paperwork when they give it to you.

    If you need a copy of the Affidavit of Support, click here.
  • Getting your Italian visa while working/interning/studying abroad: it is possible.  You don’t necessarily have to come back to the States to get your visa.  If you’re in another country, contact your local Italian consulate and inquire.  If you’re currently on a visa for whatever country you’re in, the consulate there is obligated to handle your paperwork.  If you don’t have a visa, it’s up to the discretion of the consulate, so be courteous and respectful.  They’ll probably help you out.
  • Letters of Support: they provide almost all the documentation that you’ll need.  Many consulates ask for proof of health insurance, copies of plane tickets, admission letters, proof of accommodation, etc.  It’s a LOT of paperwork to gather up.  To make it easier for you, we can provide letters of support that basically addresses all of this in one or two documents.  To request letters of support, clickhere.
Do you still have questions?  Feel free to email erin.cameron@jhu.edu or call 202-663-5700 with specific questions.
Thanks for reading!
— Erin Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions

Friday, August 30, 2013

Welcome, New SAISers!

The SAIS campus has been all a-buzz this past week as we welcomed our new students for Orientation.  A number of returning second-year M.A. students participated in the SAIS Leads Leadership Development earlier in the week, while our M.I.P.P. students worked on case studies and leadership exercises in their new student Orientation.  Our first-year M.A. students joined us on Thursday for a variety of sessions, some school-wide and others were smaller and program-specific, and today (Friday) second-year M.A. students returning to DC from SAIS Europe were welcomed with their own orientation to the DC campus.
Thanks for reading!
– Erin Skelly Cameron, Associate Director of Admissions